Posts Tagged ‘signature’

Signature requirement satisfied where written document intended to have contractual effect

July 25, 2013

In Leeman v Stocks ([1951] Ch 941) property was sold at auction. The auctioneer got the purchaser to sign a contract. He then reported to the seller on what had happened and the seller did not object. The contract was not signed by or on behalf of the seller. The wording of the printed contract ended with the words ‘As witness the hands of the parties’ and so seemed to envisage hand-written signatures. The seller later refused to proceed and the buyer sought specific performance.

The purchaser succeeded despite the lack of the seller’s signature. It was enough that the written contract was clearly regarded as the authorised and formal embodiment of the parties’ contractually binding intention and that the seller’s name was written in the contract. By requiring the purchaser to sign the contract, the auctioneer (as agent of the seller) was recognizing the name of the seller written in the contract as the seller’s signature.

While the contract seemed to require the parties’ hand-written signatures, this did not matter where there was evidence to show that neither party actually contemplated that there would be such a signature.

Michael Lower

No hand-written signature to contract where a signature is clearly anticipated

July 23, 2013

In Hubert v Treherne ((1842) 3 Man & G 743, 133 ER 1338) the parties entered into a contract that had to comply with the Statute of Frauds (and so had to be signed by them or on their behalf). The parties were identified by name at the beginning of the written contract. The contract ended with the words, ‘As witness the hands’ but no signature followed.

The court held that there was no signature. The problem was that the closing words (‘as witness the hands’) indicated that the parties intended to add hand-written signatures. The lack of such signatures was therefore fatal.

There was a difference of opinion as to whether the outcome would have been the same had those words (‘as witness..’) not appeared. Would it be enough that the names of the parties appeared in the body of the contract? At least two of the judges thought that this would be enough if it was clear that the written contract was a proper and authorised version of a concluded agreement. Another thought that this would not be enough since this degree of tolerance would effectively write the signature requirement out of existence.

Michael Lower

SMS as a written memorandum of a contract?

May 15, 2012

In Distinct Fortune Ltd v Hyndland Investment Co Ltd ([2011] 1 HKLRD 817) P agreed to buy property in Tsim Sha Tsui from D. P signed a provisional agreement and paid earnest money. D did not sign a provisional agreement but preferred to sign a formal agreement prepared by the parties’ respective solicitors. The parties’ solicitors then corresponded with each other to negotiate the terms of the formal agreement. All correspondence was ‘subject to contract’. There were two or three telephone conversations between the parties’ solicitors and between the parties’ agents in which the terms of the formal agreement were settled.  D’s representative sent P’s representative a text message to say that P would tell his solicitors to go ahead with the deal. The SMS read ‘Kim said he’ll give instruction to pig to go ahead with the deal’. Kim was a director of D and ‘pig’ was the solicitor acting for D. The next day, D’s solicitors sent out an engrossment of the formal agreement for signature by P. The engrossment was sent out under cover of a letter marked ‘subject to contract’.  P signed the formal contract and returned it to D’s solicitors with a cheque for a further deposit. D’s solicitors returned the contract and the deposit payments since D had decided against proceeding with the transaction. P sought specific performance and D countered that there was no written contract or memorandum to satisfy section 3 of the Conveyancing and Property Ordinance. P relied on the SMS message  (read together with the engrossment of the formal agreement) as the memorandum. Alternatively it argued that returning the signed formal agreement together with a cheque for the deposit amounted to part performance. D succeeded in having the action struck out on the basis that there was neither a memorandum nor part performance.

There was no memorandum. The SMS  could not simply be read together with the formal agreement to form a memorandum since the formal agreement was accompanied by a ‘subject to contract’ letter. The reference in the SMS to the intructions to be given to D’s solicitor would include the instruction to send the agreement with a ‘subject to contract’ letter. The SMS merely referred to ‘the deal’ and so there was not enough detail to forge a link with the engrossed formal agreement. Another problem was that the formal agreement was not in existence at the time of the SMS. Further, the SMS could not be a memorandum since it did not in any sense purport to be signed by D’s representative.

Nor was there part performance; the acts of submitting the signed formal agreement with a deposit were acts preparatory to a contract and not part performance of it.

The case for saying that an oral agreement had been concluded was very weak. The solicitors had been careful to label all of their letters to each other ‘subject to contract’ and to declare that their respective clients were not to be bound by anything said in the correspondence until both parties had signed a formal agreement. Properly understood, the conversations between the parties had not crossed the boundary between negotiations and a concluded contract. The court would not have struck out the action on this basis, however, since a full consideration of the facts would be necessary.

Michael Lower