Posts Tagged ‘lost modern grant’

Right of way and lost modern grant

February 7, 2019

Introduction

In Yik Wai Pong v Yick Pak Kin the Court of First Instance was asked to consider whether the plaintiff had acquired a right of way over an access road on the defendant’s land under the doctrine of lost modern grant.

Facts

The plaintiff and defendant were relatives and owned neighbouring areas of land. The plaintiff claimed to have acquired a right of way over an access road on the defendant’s land leading to the public highway.

The law

Wilson Chan J. summarised the relevant principles:

‘(1) If the owner of land uses a road as a means of access to, and egress from, his land for more than 20 years “as of right”, then, at least in the absence of special circumstances, he will obtain a right of way over the land for the benefit of his land.
(2) Whether the use is “as of right” depends on the claimant showing that it had been nec vi (without force), nec clam (without stealth) and nec precario (without permission from the owner).’ (at [73])

Reasons for the failure of the claim

Failure to establish user for a 20 year period

The plaintiff lived in the UK until 2002, only visiting the property for a week or so every few years. This was not sufficient user of the road to count for this purpose. The relevant use only began in 2002 and so the twenty year period had not been completed.

User with consent

It was doubtful whether even the post 2002 use was ‘as of right’. There was an implicit permission given the family relationship between the plaintiff and defendant ([79]).

The defendant gave the plaintiff a key so that the plaintiff could use the access road. In providing this key, the defendant could be said to be giving express permission for the plaintiff to use the road ([79]).

Michael Lower

 

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Acquisition of right of way by prescription

June 19, 2013

In Cheung Yuk Ying v Lo Koon Fuk ([2013] HKEC 932, CFI) the path leading from P’s house to the public footpath crossed the land of a Tso (represented by D). P’s land was landlocked and P claimed a right of way by prescription under the doctrine of lost modern grant. This succeeded. The path over D’s land had been used as the access between P’s property and the public footpath ‘on a reasonably regular basis’ (though perhaps not continuously) since at least the 1940s. On that basis, the doctrine of lost modern grant applied ([146] – [147]). The fact that the house was in ruins between the mid 1950s and the mid 1990s did not matter since the path was still used as an access to the property (perhaps as a way of getting to a chicken farm beyond it) during that time. The fact that, for much of that time, the occupiers and owners were all likely to have been members of the Tso did not mean that the use of the path was a private privilege reserved for members of the Tso.

The court considered, and seems to have been inclined to accept, a second and independent basis on which the easement might have come into existence. There was a re-grant of all Government leases in the New Territories in 1973 (New Territories (Renewable Government Leases) Ordinance) and all Government leases in the New Territories had been extended in 1997 (New Territories Leases (Extension) Ordinance). P’s land was land-locked. The grant of the claimed right of way could be implied on the basis of necessity on the re-grant or extension of the lease of P’s land (with a corresponding reservation on the re-grant or extension of the lease of D’s land). Alternatively, the rule in Wheeldon v Burrows or section 16 of the Conveyancing and Property Ordinance could result in the implied grant of an easement based on the then existing use of the path as a means of access from P’s land to the public footpath.

Michael Lower