Posts Tagged ‘co-ownership’

Legal tenancy in common: contractual interpretation

November 4, 2015

In Lam Kwok Hing v Lam Siu Keung ([2015] HKEC 2228, CFI) four brothers were tenants in common in equal shares of land in the New Territories (‘the Land’). They were also co-owners of several adjoining lots. The brothers entered into four contemporaneous transactions in 1972 to re-arrange the ownership of the Land and the adjoining lots. The 1972 transaction concerning the land assigned it to two of the brothers, LLW (2/5 shares) and LTW (3/5 shares). A separate ‘Division of Property’ document, signed by the four brothers, confirmed the overall effect of the four transactions. In a  document called ” 執照 ” and dated 2 September 1974, the District Commissioner, New Territories certified that LLW owned 2/5 and LTW owned 3/5 of the shares in the Land. LLW died in 1976 and in 2005 his family contended that his share was 9/20 rather than 2/5 (that he owned an additional 1/20).

The court now had to decide on the parties’ respective shares. The fact that the 1972 assignment recorded LLW as owner of 2/5 provided the starting point. All of the relevant legal and factual material available to the court supported the contention of the LTW family that the assignment accurately recorded the parties’ contractual intention. The undivided shares reflected the physical division of the Land between the two families. the Division of Property and the 執照 confirmed the ownership intention. Finally, the Schedule of Property annexed to the Letters of Administration of LLW’s estate also referred to his ownership of a 2/5 share.

The case is interesting since there was no recourse to the concept of the common intention constructive trust. In Hong Kong, unlike England, disputes as to ownership shares can be resolved through a process of contractual interpretation that focuses on ownership of the legal title.

Michael Lower

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Legal joint tenancy: determining beneficial ownership under a common intention constructive trust

March 11, 2015

In Lo Kau Kun v Cheung Yuk Yun ([2015] HKEC 316, CFI) a married couple bought a flat as joint tenants. P claimed that the property was held on common intention constructive trust in equal shares. D claimed that she was the sole beneficial owner. Deputy Judge Sakhrani referred to the statements in Stack v Dowden ([68] in Stack) and Jones v Kernott ( [51] in Jones) to the effect that where the legal title is in joint names and there is a question as to beneficial ownership equity follows the law (so that a legal joint tenancy gives rise to equal shares) but that it may be possible to show a contrary intention (the burden of proof being on the party seeking to establish this). P had paid the down payment. P and D were jointly liable under the terms of the mortgage and each had contributed to the mortgage payments. Crucially, there was a finding that the parties had discussed their intentions concerning the ownership of the property ([63]). The couple had agreed that the property was to be a family asset (to be held equally as a family asset according to P) ([64]). This (not the record of financial contributions) was determinative. The property was held on common intention constructive trust in equal shares ([66]).

D also argued that she had extinguished P’s title by adverse possession. P had left the property in 1993 after a violent argument and never returned ([77]). This argument failed since D was entitled to be in possession as co-owner. There was no evidence of the ouster that would be necessary for this claim to succeed ([81]).

Michael Lower

Does a charging order sever a joint tenancy?

February 4, 2015

In Ho Hai Kwan v Chan Hon Kuen ([2015] HKEC 132, CFI) the question was whether there had been an equitable severance of a joint tenancy by virtue of a charging order in respect of the property against one of the co-owners. Was it an act operating on the joint tenant’s share? There were obiter dicta in previous Court of Appeal decisions (Malahon Credit Co Ltd v Siu Chun Wah Alice and Fortis Bank v Yu Kam Hoi Herman) to suggest that this was the case. In this case, it was successfully argued that a charging order did not have this effect. The argument was that a charging order (enforceable in the same way as an equitable charge by virtue of section 20B(3) of the High Court Ordinance) does not confer any title on the person who obtained it but merely creates an encumbrance ([19]). Thus, a charging order had no effect on the four unities of the joint tenancy and was insufficiently final and irrevocable; there was no alienation ([20] – [31]). The charging order did not sever the joint tenancy ([58]).

Michael Lower

Ousted tenants in common need to seek remedy promptly

June 21, 2013

In Ma Weineng v Ma Hook Kwan ([2013] HKEC 788, CFI) A and B were joint tenants and then (from 2007) tenants in common in equal shares of property. A and then A’s successor in title had been in exclusive possession since 1987 (both personally in possession and by retaining the entire rent derived from lettings of parts of the property). A’s successor was granted a declaration that B was now prevented by the Limitation Ordinance from bringing any action against A’s successor arising from his share in the property. A and A’s successor’s long ouster of B meant that B had lost his half share in the property. B’s title was extinguished.

Michael Lower

When is one co-owner who collected rent liable to account to the other?

November 24, 2011

Where one co-owner collects rents the mere fact of being co-owners does not give rise to a liability to account to the other co-owner(s). A liability to account to the other for the latter’s share arises where the former is the agent or bailiff of the latter. It can also arise in partition actions (or actions that are equivalent), administration actions, in other cases where there is a fund in court, where the court makes an order for sale as an alternative to partition or where one party claims an interest under a resulting or constructive trust and the court is asked to quantify that interest (paras. 103 – 105).

Where one co-owner collects the other’s share of rent, it is possible to imply an agency. It is also possible (depending on the context) that this agent holds the rents collected on a ‘real’ constructive trust so that there is no limitation period in respect of the claim by the agent for the rents received (see Limitation Ordinance, s. 20).

In Chen Yu Tsui v Tong Kui Kwong ([2005] HKEC 1679, CA) property was held by two brothers as tenants in common in equal shares. One brother (the defendant) collected all the rents and after a time stopped accounting to the other (the plaintiff’s deceased husband) for his share of the rents. The plaintiff brought an action to recover the rents. It was held that there was a duty to account in this case  since the defendant had impliedly acted as his brother’s agent (paras. 111 – 112). The action was not time-barred. This was a ‘real’ constructive trust to which section 20(1) of the Limitation ordinance applied (para. 123).

Michael Lower

Beneficiary seeking order for sale / account in an interlocutory application

November 9, 2011

In Lam Sik Shi v Lam Sik Ying ([2008] HKEC 1048) P was the beneficiary under a trust of his late father’s estate. D1, his half-brother, was the trustee. D2 was a company which had bought property forming part of the trust estate. P alleged that the sale was at an undervalue and he sought a declaration that the sale was void or voidable. He sought to have D2 account as constructive trustee. A lis pendens had been registered. In an interlocutory hearing, P sought an order for sale with the proceeds to be paid into court pending the final hearing or, alternatively, the appointment of a receiver. The court refused to make either order. P’s position was adequately protected by the registration of the lis pendens.

Michael Lower