Archive for the ‘equity of exoneration’ Category

The equity of exoneration: tenant in common charging her share to protect property from partner’s creditor

October 8, 2017

Insol Funding Company Limited v Cowlam ([2017] EWHC 1822 (Ch)) also raised the question of the equity of exoneration.

Ms Cowlam co-habited with Mr Cowey. They were equitable tenants in common of the family home (‘the property’). Insol was Mr Cowey’s creditor with an equitable charge over Mr Cowey’s share in the property. It sought an order for sale of the property.

To protect her rights in the property, Ms Cowlam agreed to pay Insol GBP 330,000. This was to be treated as part payment of Mr Cowey’s debt. Ms Cowlam granted Insol an equitable charge over her share to secure the sum that she had agreed to pay.

Ms Cowlam claimed to have a proprietary right over Mr Cowey’s share by virtue of the equity of exoneration. This would arise on the date when she charged her interest with the payment of the sum due under her agreement with Insol ([38]).

Ms. Cowlam argued that in granting the charge and in making payment to Insol, she had charged her share with the payment of part of Mr Cowey’s indebtedness to Insol ([35]). Ms Cowlam argued that she had become a guarantor or surety for Mr Cowey’s indebtedness and was entitled to be exonerated out of his share ([113]).

Master Bowles explained that:

‘an equity of exoneration can arise in circumstances where property is charged for the benefit, not of the chargor, but as security for the debts of another and that, where such an equity arises, the chargor is to be regarded as a guarantor, or surety, for the debtor and can look to the debtor for indemnity, or exoneration, in the event that the charge is called upon.’ ([114]).

The equity is proprietary as well as conferring personal rights as against the debtor ([114]). Master Bowles saw no reason why it should not entitle the person claiming it to security over the debtor’s property ([114]).

The equity of exoneration arises from the ‘express, implied, or presumed, intentions of the parties’ ([115]). It was not available here. Ms Cowlam ‘entered into the settlement agreement, in her own right and for her own reasons and was, in so doing, acting purely as a volunteer’.

Michael Lower

 

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The equity of exoneration: family homes and indirect benefits

April 18, 2017

In Armstrong v Onyearu ([2017] EWCA Civ 268, CA (Eng)) title to Mr and Mrs Onyearu’s family home was in Mr Onyearu’s name but the couple had equal beneficial shares. Mr Onyearu borrowed money to finance his business. The loan was secured by a charge over the family home. The business failed. A was Mr Onyearu’s trustee in bankruptcy.

The question was whether Mrs Onyearu was entitled to rely on an equity of exoneration as against Mr Onyearu (and as against A). A contended that she was not since she had derived an indirect benefit from the loan: it enabled Mr Onyearu to keep his business going and so to continue to meet the mortgage payments.

David Richards LJ, delivering the Court of Apeal’s judgment, explained the equity of exoneration:

‘Where property jointly owned by A and B is charged to secure the debts of B only, A is or may be entitled to a charge over B’s share of the property to the extent that B’s debts are paid out of A’s share.’ ([1])

Whether the equity applies depends on the parties’ common intention ([3]). Where there is no evidence of an actual intention, a presumed intention may arise depending on all the relevant circumstances. In particular, the court looks at whether the co-owner derived any benefit from the debt secured on the property ([3]).

The equity is part of the law relating to the rights of sureties ([24]).

The importance of this case is that it examines whether the type of indirect benefit that Mrs Onyearu was said to have derived from the loan to her husband was relevant to the parties’ presumed intention ([8]).

A contended that the equity could only arise if Mrs Onyearu received no benefit, direct or indirect, from the secured loan ([20]). In effect, A was arguing that the equity could rarely arise in the family home context given the likelihood that the parties’ financial affairs were, at least somewhat, intertwined.

David Richards LJ’s review of the authorities led him to the conclusion that an indirect benefit is not sufficient to deny a right of exoneration to parties in the position of Mrs Onyearu ([82]).

He said:

‘An indirect benefit of the type relied on in this case is far from certain to accrue. In the present case, any benefit was subject to a double contingency: first, that the firm would survive and, secondly, that it would be profitable. Further, the intention as regards the equity is to be inferred as at the date of the transaction. As at that date, the prospect of benefit was wholly uncertain and incapable of any valuation … In general, the benefits must be capable of carrying a financial value’ ([83]).

Mrs Onyearu was entitled to rely on the equity.

Michael Lower