Actual intention? Common intention constructive trust not presumed resulting trust.

In Re Superyield Holdings Ltd ([2000] 2 HKC 90) a father and son each had one of the two issued shares in SH Ltd. SH Ltd, in turn, held one of the two issued shares in SC Ltd (along with another company LKR Ltd which was essentially owned and controlled by the son). SC Ltd owned a residential property (‘the property’). The question was whether the son was solely beneficially entitled to the property. Recorder Robert Kotewall SC found that he was. The son argued that since the property was bought using a combination of the son’s own funds and a loan to the company that the son had arranged, he could rely on the presumption of a resulting trust. The court seems rather to have found for the son on the basis of the father and son’s actual intention. The judge thought that where the trust rested on actual intention then the presumption of resulting trust had no part to play (at 111). He accepted that SH Ltd was in substance the son’s company and that the father was only involved as a formality to satisfy the then requirements of the Companies Ordinance. The father had been one of the joint guarantors of the loan to SC Ltd used to buy the property and it was possible to argue that this should be treated as a contribution to the purchase price by the father. This would depend upon underlying intention. In any case, the presumption of advancement would apply so that this contribution should be presumed to be a gift from father to son.

Michael Lower

Advertisements

Tags: , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: