Quiet enjoyment: landlord’s liability for the actions of other tenants

In Hilton v James Smith & Sons (Norwood) Ltd ([1979] 2 EGLR 44, CA (Eng)) L owned a row of shops with a private road (a cul de sac) giving access to the rear of the shops. T was the tenant of the end of the cul de sac. It had an easement to use the road for access and delivery but could never use it because other tenants and people making deliveries to them parked in such a way as to obstruct the road. The leases of all of the shops contained a prohibition on parking cars, obstructing the road or causing a nuisance or annoyance to the landlord or other tenants and to use the road only for delivery purposes. L was liable to T (even though the actions were not lawful under the terms of the other tenants’ leases) in nuisance and for breach of the covenants for quiet enjoyment and non-derogation from grant (Ormrod L.J. thought the label didn’t matter). L was liable because it had the means of bringing the problem to an end (an action for nuisance or breach of the express covenant just mentioned) but had done nothing.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: